Tag Archives: ethnomusicology

Peeking Ahead To the 2012 Grammy Awards

I found my preliminary ballots for the 2009 and 2010 Grammy Awards. Here’s a breakdown of the entries in the three primary categories that will compete for the “Best Regional Roots Music Album” Grammy in 2012 :

  • Best Zydeco Or Cajun Music Album 2009: 30 entries, 2010: 34 entries
  • Best Native American Music Album 26 entries, 2010: 32 entries
  • Best Hawaiian Music Album 20 entries, 2010: 32 entries

I should note that the Board of Governors of the Hawai‘i Academy of Recording arts went to extraordinary lengths to get entries in 2010. I personally entered half of the 32 entries into the Hawaiian category on behalf of various artists and labels. There likely would have been far less if we had not done so. Given the numbers above, I think it would be foolish for people to assume that Hawaiian releases have no chance of wining the award. It’s all going to come down to networking and PR, as it always has. Which means it will be business as usual for those that covet the trophy.

 

The Hawaiian Grammy Is No More

Today The Recording Academy, bestowers of the annual Grammy Awards, announced a major restructuring of the awards that reduces the number of awards from 109 to 78. This change will be implemented in next years awards–the 54th Annual Grammy Awards. One of the categories affected by this adjustment is the Grammy Award for Best Hawaiian Album–it has been eliminated. However, releases that would have been eligible in this category will now be eligible in the new “Best Regional Roots Music Album” at the 54th Grammy Awards. Other genre that previously had their own categories and will be entered in this category next are Best Native American Music Album and Best Zydeco or Cajun Music Album. Or course, Hawai‘i releases in other genre categories can enter in those categories.

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University of Sheffield Looking For A Lecturer

The Department of Music, University of Sheffield wishes to appoint a full-time, fixed term lecturer in ethnomusicology for the period 18 August 2008 to 18 May 2009. The programme in ethnomusicology at Sheffield is one of the largest in Britain, with three full-time lecturing staff.

I visited Sheffield and met the staff their at the International Council for Traditional Music conference back in summer 2004, and seriously considered enrolling in their Ph.d. program at one point. The exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and British pound was an insurmountable obstacle.