Category Archives: ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i

Using ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i On Your Computer or Mobile Device

With the start of the school semester and the flow of questions coming in about the support available for ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i in various computer operating systems and mobile devices, this is a good time for me to pimp the ‘Ōlelo-Tech portion of my blog (see the menu under the masthead). There you’ll find links that describe the extent of keyboard, font and other support for Macintosh, iOS, Windows, and Android, as well as tricks to using ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i on the web and with Microsoft Word. As always, a caveat that I don’t provide tech support for any of these (unless rewarded handsomely in some way). If they work for you great, if not, keep trying!

Signs of ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i In The Universe

I always love running into fellow Hawaiian speakers that I haven’t met before. I often wondered how many times I’ve encountered a fellow kanaka ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i, and we used English simply because we each didn’t know that the other could speak Hawaiian. I had an idea a few years ago to set up a directory of Hawaiian speakers in business so that we could seek out each other and know where we could go to order a coffee, get a hair cut, purchase a car, or just about anything using Hawaiian.

I had just finished a meeting with folks from The Recording Academy in Honolulu, was dropped off at the airport by you know who, and standing in line at Starbucks in the inter-island terminal to buy a bottle of juice. I heard the fellow at the counter ask the customer ahead of me for his name, using Hawaiian – ‘o wai kou inoa – followed by a translation in English. When I stepped up to buy my juice, he asked me if I wanted anything else, to which I replied – ‘o kēia wale nō, mahalo (just this, thanks). He smiled and we completed our transaction in Hawaiian. I wish things like this happened more often.

No laila, e ka po‘e ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i, e kāko‘o kākou i kēia hoa ke kipa kākou i ke kahua mokulele kaumoku ma Honolulu!

Featured on Indigenous Tweets

Kevin Scannell have corresponded for many years in regards to issues that face indigenous and endangered languages and the use of technology in their revitalization. I was honored that he asked me to do this interview and talk about the work that I’ve done at Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani over the years in regards to Hawaiian language and its use in technology. His website, Indigenous Tweets, keeps track of the use of various indigenous languages around the world.

Type ‘Okina and Kahakō in Android

I purchased a Droid X phone in July 2010 with the specific desire to see the Android operating system support Hawaiian and other Polynesian languages as iOS (iPhone/iPod/iPad) does. While Android may someday have native support for ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i like iOS, there is an interim solution to typing the ‘okina and kahakō on Android.

Handy Font Utilities for Indigenous Language Use

I’ll probably create a page for these things I come across, but am still trying to figure out the best way to approach organizing this website.

I’m frequently find myself lamenting that I don’t have a system for easily determining what default fonts on Mac OS support Hawaiian. I know a few off the top of my head – Lucida Grande, Helvetica, Times New Roman, Palatino, Courier, Didot – but not all. This is complicated by the fact that some fonts have most of the vowel kahakō combinations but not the ‘okina. A few have the ‘okina but not the vowel kahakō combinations, which makes choosing a non-standard font a bit of an adventure. I decided to spend some time working on this and found a couple of tools on the Mac and Windows that helped. I’m documenting it here since it may be of use to other indigenous language advocates:

 

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Apple Fonts With ‘Okina and Kahakō

I got tired of trying to remember every font that does and does not have the ‘okina and/or kahakō in it, so using the Apple Font Tools I came up with a spreadsheet that shows which fonts have which characters. It’s available for download at scribd.com. As always, there is no guarantee or tech support offered. Please don’t email asking why you don’t have a particular font on your system. Perhaps it’s just bad luck. Hopefully someday Apple will add all of these characters to all of the fonts that ship with OS X. Or OS XI, or…

Apple Fonts With ‘Okina and Kahakō

How To Give Good ‘Okina

How To Give Good ‘Okina

I’ve been asked this question so many times I decided it was time to write an article about it. The question (and its many variations) boil down to this:

“What is the ‘okina, why do I need to use it in my web pages, what is the right character to use, what fonts should I use, what should I do if the font I want to use doesn’t have that character, and what other issues are involved in using it?”

Read on for the answers to these questions…

The College of Hawaiian Language Urgently Needs Your Support

Aloha kākou. This legislative session the state legislature is considering a bill which will provide funding for the construction of a new building on the UH-Hilo campus to house Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. Currently staff and faculty of the college are spread out over three locations on the UHH campus, making it difficult sometimes for students to even locate their teachers. And we have only a single classroom dedicated for our exclusive use; every semester we must compete with other programs for adequate classrooms in which to teach our classes. Well all know the importance of a sense of place in the Hawaiian culture. Well, our students, faculty and staff have no “place” to call our own on the UHH campus.

Below I have listed some of the highlights of our College’s achivements:

  1. Among the fastest growing programs at highly cramped UH-Hilo
  2. The College is highly community service oriented
  3. New building to be at the physical and academic focal point of a future expanded UH-Hilo campus
  4. Academically and culturally tied to highly successful bilingual ‘Imiloa Astronomy Education Center
  5. Hawaiian Language College programs draw numerous national and international visitors
  6. Most developed indigenous language revitalization program in the world
  7. Largest Hawaiian language focused major count in the State
  8. The sole Hawaiian Studies Ph.D. program in the UH System
  9. A national model for immersion at the tertiary level with Hawaiian B.A., M.A., Teacher Certification, and Ph.D. in Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization
  10. Provides other indigenous peoples with opportunities to enroll through its Linguistics B.A., an Indigenous Education M.A., and the Ph.D.
  11. Partners at the graduate level with University of Arizona, University of Alaska, and University of Waikato (New Zealand)
  12. The only fully operational P-20 educational system in Hawai‘i with the P-12 Hawaiian Immersion Nāwahī Laboratory School that includes early college enrollment
  13. In 2009, Nāwahī School was one of only five schools on Hawai‘i Island with the highest rating under Federal No Child Left Behind legislation
  14. The College’s Hale Kuamo‘o Service Center is the main source of curriculum materials and teacher support for over 2,000 students in P-12 Hawaiian Immersion Statewide
  15. The College’s Ulukau Hawaiian Electronic Library (operated in conjunction with Alu Like, Inc.) is a major resource with Hawaiian dictionaries, archives, etc. Over the past five years, Ulukau has received over 40 million hits from users around the world
  16. The College’s Leokī telecommunications system was the first in the world to provide a completely translated interface and ability to communicate completely in any indigenous language in the world.
  17. The College’s Hale Kuamo’o has worked diligently with technology providers such as Apple Computer, Inc., Google, Netscape Communications and Microsoft to enhance the ability of Hawaiian speakers to utilized advanced technologies. The presence of native support for the Hawaiian language in Apple’s Macintosh operating system, the iPhone and iPad are a direct result of the College’s initiatives.

The bill which will fund construction of our college’s already-designed facility has passed the state House of Representatives and is currently in the Senate’s Ways and Means commitee. We would like to ask for your assistance in contacting members of this committee and express your support for funding. You may send emails, fax or call any of these senators, however, your contact is particularly important if you are a resident of the district that the senator represents. Please feel free to share this communication with your family and friends, and ask them to support us as well. Mahalo nui!

Shan S.Tsutsui
4th Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 206
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
Phone 808-586-7344; Fax 808-586-7348
From Maui, toll free 984-2400 + 67344
e-mail [ mailto:sentsutsui@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]sentsutsui@Capitol.hawaii.gov

Jill N.Tokuda
24th Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 218
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
phone 808-587-7215; fax 808-587-7220
E-mail [ mailto:sentokuda@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]sentokuda@Capitol.hawaii.gov

J. Kalani English[
6th Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 205
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
phone 808-587-7225; fax 808-587-7230
From Maui, toll free 984-2400 + 77225
From Molokai and Lanai, toll free 1-800-468-4644 + 77225
E-mail [ mailto:senenglish@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]senenglish@Capitol.hawaii.gov
[ http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/site1/links/linkto.asp?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fkalanienglish%2Ecom&Text=J%2E+Kalani+English ]J. Kalani English Home Page

CarolFukunaga
11th Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 216
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
phone 808-586-6890; fax 808-586-6899
e-mail: [ mailto:senfukunaga@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]senfukunaga@Capitol.hawaii.gov

BrickwoodGaluteria
12th Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 208
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
phone 808-586-6740; fax 808-586-6829
e-mail [ mailto:sengaluteria@capitol.hawaii.gov ]sengaluteria@capitol.hawaii.gov

ClaytonHee
23rd Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 228
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
Phone 808-586-7330; Fax 808-586-7334
e-mail [ mailto:senhee@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]senhee@Capitol.hawaii.gov

Russell S.Kokubun
2nd Senatorial District
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 407
415 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813
Phone 808-586-6760 ; Fax 808-586-6689
From the Big Island, toll free 974-4000 + 66760
Email [ mailto:senkokubun@Capitol.hawaii.gov ]senkokubun@Capitol.hawaii.gov

You may visit our college’s website to learn more about our programs: http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/khuok/

Technology In The Hawaiian Language Revitalization Movement

I was honored to be asked to speak to the Big Island Internet Society’s meeting yesterday, and was asked to put together a list of links to pages and articles that provided more information on these topics. So here are a few:

  • Wired Magazine artice on our early efforts to establish Leokī
  • Kualono – website of Ka Haka ‘Ula College of Hawaiian Language
  • Ulukau– the Hawaiian Digital Library
  • ‘Aha Pūnana Leo’s Niuolahiki online class website
  • Unicode and Hawaiian Language
  • ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i – A Rich Oral History, A Bright Digital Future – Article from Cultural Survival Quarterly
  • Leokī: A Powerful Voice of Hawaiian Language Revitalization– Article
  • Ke A‘o Ho’okeleka‘a‘ike – Hawaiian Language Instruction Via The Internet – Article
  • Hawaiian Language Support in OS X – from MacWorld
  • Hawaiian Language support on iPhone
  • Google Supports Hawaiian – from CNN.com
  • Mahalo to Larry Czerwonka for extending the invitation, and to everyone who attended.